I've got a solution to the recycling problem. Pass a law that says that every company has to accept back any products they provide, when they reach end-of-life. So, for example, retailers would have to accept packaging waste back from customers, and the wholesaler that sold them the product would have to accept it back from them. Internalizing the cost of dealing with waste would motivate companies to make less disposable stuff, and find ways to make it easier to recycle:
fivethirtyeight.com/features/t

@strypey Looking around my office...

I have literally no idea where most of these things came from.

As a business, I'm not taking back your waste unless you show a receipt. Why should I?

Like so many other failed recycling schemes, this one fails at usability, dumping a shit ton of extra cognitive load on the average joe. Even people who care will be hard pressed to get it right - and most people won't care.

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@HerraBRE so your priorities are
1) convenience for businesses and customers
2) livable biosphere

This is precisely why the costs that businesses are busy externalizing onto everybody else (ecosystems, the public, governments etc) need to be internalized. Because the only way to make some business people care about the problems they create, is to make those problems cost *them* money. Then solutions come thick and fast.

@HerraBRE the regulation I'm proposing would include rules for making sure businesses identify themselves on the products they manufacture, along with the identity of every handler between them and the customer. But what's important here is that once they know they have take financial responsibility for the end-of-life disposal of the waste they profit from, business will go so fast it will make your head spin.

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