Strypey (Quitter.se refugee) is a user on mastodon.nzoss.nz. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse. If you don't, you can sign up here.

I need to set up my GNU/Linux desktop so that every time I log in, it automatically connects my , and then logs me into my email and chat accounts, using a set of minimal background daemons. I want those daemons to notify me when I receive email, or delayed chat messages, or when a contact wants to initiate a realtime chat (text/ voice/ video), and ask me if I want to open the relevant GUI client

I was to be able to use separate comms tools for different use cases (personal, work, community etc). But I want all those comms tools integrated with one address book tool, that allows me to manage multiple identities, but gives me one contact database to regularly back up. I want that contact database stored in a common format, so I can back it up by copying a single file/ folder, or change address book tools without disruption

@strypey might be worth looking at hosting your own NextCloud for that sort of synced-data-across-all-your-devices thing. There'd be other benefits, too (shared calendar, shared storage, auto upload of some stuff, etc.).

Strypey (Quitter.se refugee) @strypey

@lightweight I have access to via , but I've have trouble integrating it with my desktop. Mind you, I just upgraded to Trisquel 8 (based off Ubuntu 16.06), so that might help when I get time to play with it all again.

@strypey don't see why it wouldn't work...

@lightweight part of the reason is that I've been hesitant to install anything that isn't in my distro's default repos (up until a few days ago, based off 14.04). Recently I decided that if I'm going to trust the software to run securely on my system, what difference does it make to trust its developers to run a secure PPA? Also new tech like etc is making it easier to just download binaries and test them like you can on MacOS, which is making me more willing to experiment.

@strypey hmm. Not sure there's anything easier or better than a plain old brilliant .deb and apt... You can install what you like, try it out, and uninstall it (and its dependencies)... generally PPAs are as secure as official repos if they employ checksums.